Interfaith dating site

I can imagine how their parents feel about it, whether they are the children of two Jewish parents or one, whether their parents were born Jewish or are Jewish by choice.Every one of these teenagers goes to a school in North Carolina where they are in a tiny minority; in some cases a student might even be the only Jew in the entire school.“It doesn’t mean that anti-Semitism is over, but there’s much more philo-Semitism than anti-Semitism in America.” Riley says intermarriage is both a cause and effect of this phenomenon.“The more you have exposure to people of other faiths, the more likely you are to like them and then marry them yourself,” she said.• You don't have to be Jewish to find favor in G-d's eyes • G-d gave only seven basic commandments to gentiles • Yiddish words for gentiles are goy, shiksa and shkutz • Judaism does not approve of interfaith marriage, but it is very common • Jews do not proselytize, but it is possible to convert to Judaism Judaism maintains that the righteous of all nations have a place in the world to come.This has been the majority rule since the days of the Talmud.As more and more people are forming relationships with partners of other faiths and cultures, it’s important for us to support one another.We’re not here to tell you whether your relationship is right or wrong, or whether it can ‘work’.

By the same token, Mormons, who encourage early nuptials, are the least likely faith to outmarry.

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We are happy to provide basic information on mixed marriage, although it is not always possible to put you in touch with couples for features.

Another factor behind the comparatively high Jewish intermarriage rate is, simply, that Americans like Jews.

Riley cites the work of sociologists Robert Putnam and David Campbell, who measured the popularity of various religious groups with extensive surveys for their 2010 book, “American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us.” “America, for the most part, loves its Jews,” agreed Paul Golin, the associate executive director of the Jewish Outreach Institute.